Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Organizing the Kitchen Zone


October is the perfect time to organize your kitchen. The next few months will involve a lot of holiday cooking. Food drives begin to show up everywhere so it is a great opportunity to donate foods you have overstocked this past year. This opens up space for holiday cooking supplies.

My Kitchen Strategy:

  1. Look at my motivation. Why work on the kitchen now? Are my counter tops cluttered? Do I have trouble finding needed items in my pantry? Do I have items taking up space in my freezer that I can't even identify? Yep, and I want it fixed before the holidays!
  2. Create my vision. I like to work in my kitchen so I want it to be an inviting place that is uncluttered.  I want open countertops that are ready for food prep or rolling out cookie or pie dough. I want all my basic stored foods and spices organized and fresh so I can easily put my hand on what I want without missing a beat. 
  3. Brainstorm. I list all the things I can think of that will make my kitchen match my vision. Some of the tasks are: clearing out items I no longer need or love, looking for new storage ideas, organizing items for more convenience, better defining my kitchen zones (food preparation, cooking, dishes, food storage, and food serving). 
  4. Write our my goals. Writing out my goals helps me focus. I make my goals specific and measurable. I print them out and post them on my refrigerator and cross them off when met.
  5. Develop a timeline. Here is where my calendar becomes my friend.  I look at all the available times I have to work on my goals. To make this doable, I plan for some unexpected things to come up and I break down bigger goals into smaller parts. Instead of booking a day of "organizing kitchen drawers", I schedule "organizing the knife drawer" on Oct. 4 at 3:00.
  6. Follow the timeline. As best I can, I honor the times I have set aside to do the tasks. If something comes up and I can't do the work at the scheduled time, I reschedule it. 
  7. Reward myself. When the kitchen zone is complete, I give myself a reward. It might be flowers on the table or a nice candlelit meal.
For more details of following this plan, visit my website www.timespaceorg.com and purchase my book, From Vision to Victory: A Workbook For Finding a Simple Path to an Organized Home, or sign up for my Zone Plan Teleclass program where I guide you through a new zone each month.  


Jonda S. Beattie
Professional Organizer

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Using Found Time


I am a professional organizer. My weekly schedule is all over the place. Some weeks I work long days with clients and end up way too tired at the end of the week. Some weeks I spend most of my time at my desk and go stir crazy. My ideal week is a nice mix of working with clients and taking care of admin work. I can not really control when I will get new clients or when my existing ones want extra time. I can, of course, always say no to jobs when I am overbooked or exhausted, but find that I rarely do.

On Sundays I set out my intended schedule for the week. I have a plan for every day. It is pretty rare if my schedule ends up the way it was planned. I may have someone new call in for an appointment. More often I have clients who need to reschedule, move the time a bit, or cancel for the week.

So, what to do when I get a cancellation or postponement and now have some found time?
  • It it's an entire day, like a snow day, the best way to use the time might be just to relax. Read a book. Spend some quality time with my husband.
  • It it's a half day, I might use part of it on a project that has been on the burner too long and then reward that work with reading or doing something in my home just for family.
  • If it is 15 minutes to 30 minutes then the time is more likely to be frittered away if there is no plan. I have a saying by my desk that says, "Savor or Squander". So rather than spend that time scrolling through Facebook, I have a list of things I can do without any thought.
    1. Work on clearing out my email inbox
    2. File
    3. Follow up with potential clients via a quick email or call
    4. Clear off my desk and tidy my office
    5. Meditate
    6. Work on an upcoming blog
    7. Work on a presentation
    8. Exercise in the office
    9. Walk around my yard
    10. Update my timeline for a project
The idea is that you stay in control of how your time is used. How you use found time depends on you, your working style, and what is pressing on your to do list. But do make a conscious decision what to do with the gift of found time. Put those chunks of time to their most productive use for you.



Jonda S. Beattie
Professional Organizer

Thursday, September 20, 2018

The Importance of Maintenance


You've done it! You finally finished organizing your (fill in the blank - files, pantry, closet, etc.). It feels so good! You are glad the project is finished.

But wait a minute. It is really not "finished". It needs a maintenance plan. Just like laundry or dirty dishes are not "done" forever, neither is your finished project. When you finish working on any organizational project you need a plan to keep it organized.

Let's look at some examples:

  • If you have finished setting up your filing system and everything is now filed neatly away. You need to have a plan in place to keep those files working. When paper comes in, it should go in a file immediately - do not lay it down on your desk "just for now". Papers should either be trashed, shredded, or filed. If you don't have time to do more than a rough sort now, have in place a landing pad and schedule a time to work on emptying it. At least yearly have a time scheduled to go through your files and empty out what is now redundant or not needed.
  • Your pantry is beautiful! All expired foods have been disposed and your goods are nicely lined up, in containers, labeled, and reachable. Now, every time you come home form the store, put all your pantry items away correctly. Don't just put them in the pantry wherever there is a space. Have all the soups in one space, all canned fruit, all pasta, etc. It should look like the shelves at the store. If you bought a can of tomato soup and you already have a can of tomato soup, the new can should stand behind the old one, so your foods are rotated. At least once a year, schedule a time to take items out of your pantry, clean it out, and check expiration dates.
  • Your bedroom closet is a sight to behold. All blouses are arranged by short sleeve and long sleeve. Your slacks are hung by color. There is space between hangers. Lovely! Now, take a moment and turn all your hangers backwards. The first time you wear an item, turn the hanger to the correct position. This way you keep track of what you are actually wearing. When you buy a new item of clothing, consider getting rid of something you already have. When laundry is done, hang up what goes into your closet in the correct place right away. When you take an item out of the closet to wear, put the empty hanger to one side of the closet. Once or twice a year schedule a time to reorganize and clean out your closet.
I recommend using a zone plan for maintenance on your whole home. This keeps you from zig-zagging around with your projects. Divide your home into zones and schedule one zone for each month. 

I offer a teleclass to help you with this process. Check out htttp://timespaceorg.com/teleclass/.



Jonda S. Beattie
Professional Organizer

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Organizing Your Storage Areas

In September the weather starts to cool down a bit. We put away our summer equipment. This is a fantastic opportunity to organize this storage space. It might be your workshop, garage, or basement. It is such a temptation to go in and just dump the stuff "just for now". Soon you find the area disorganized, cluttered, and difficult to move around in.

Before you begin on this project, take a good look at the way it is now. Look at what is working (don't mess with that area) and what is not working. How do you plan to use this zone? Do you plan to:
  • Park your car
  • Store trash cans/recycling
  • Store tools and accessories
  • Pot or repot plants
  • Work on projects and store tools
  • Store bikes and other sports equipment/outdoor games/camping gear
  • Store entertainment supplies
  • Store extra products
Now bring the things outside. If it is a small area do it all at once but if it is a large area or very filled, do it by sections. Sort like with like. Note what is broken and what you have not used in the past year or two. Get rid of those items. Throw away expired seeds and old chemicals. Give away or sell tools you no longer use.

Next decide where to logically places your zones. You want to place items that you use frequently near entrances. As you group your items in each zone, look for containers to hold small items together. A clear shoebox without a lid can hold gardening gloves. A flat basket can hold small gardening tools. Use shelves, pegboards, hooks, and nails to keep items off the floor. Avoid stacking containers because, for sure, you are going to want something out of that bottom container. Label all containers that are not clear.

Knock down the cobwebs, sweep the floor, and start putting things away. You'll be amazed at how much room there is now that all items have been bunched together and stored properly.

Reward yourself. A hot shower and a cool drink might be just the thing.



Jonda S. Beattie
Professional Organizer

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Paper Management - Part 2: Filing

Try as hard as we can, we still have a lot of paper that comes into our homes. If we are not vigilant, it will stack up on our counters, tables, and desks. It will add clutter to our lives and it will be hard to locate that paper that is really important (I know my license renewal paperwork is in here somewhere).

Having a filing system that works for you is key to keeping those surfaces uncluttered.

Let's start with setting up a desktop file or action file. This is where most of the current incoming paperwork will probably land. The concept is that each piece of paper requires an action even if that action is to throw it away. Your files will separate the papers by the action required. Likely file headings are "Pay", " Do", "Contact", "Pending", "Read", "File". If you take all the paper that has come in this week, it should fit into one of the files. If you have something that does not fit there, ask yourself, "What action is necessary?" and make another file. The goal is to have no loose papers on any surfaces.

I usually have some projects that I am working on. These generate paper. I may have some research, a draft, or ideas for the projects. I use project bins for this type of paper. When I am working on the project, I pull out the papers and when my work time is up, I shove the papers back into the bin.

Then there are the other bits of paper we might keep that don't fit into those categories. I have envelopes in my desk drawer for receipts that I need to keep. I have a plastic envelope in the kitchen for coupons I might use. I have files near my cookbooks for recipes. I have some files in my bookcase for special interests (exercise, landscaping, decorating).

I also have a file where I store all house related information, warranties and directions for household items.

Then we also have our permanent basic files where we keep our financial papers, insurance, vital records, medical records, tax papers and so forth. We also have files for archival papers such as past taxes, old property sales, bank records, military paperwork, or any paperwork that we rarely need but want to find if necessary. Archival files do not have to be handy so they can be stored in the top of a closet or in the attic.

The purpose of files is to keep paper from stacking up and to make paperwork easy to locate. The files should be easy to use and access or you will find yourself laying down that paper "just for now."

Start with your most recent stacks of paper and see what action you need to take. Soon you will enjoy your open spaces on your surfaces that were once covered in paper.




Jonda S. Beattie
Professional Organizer

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Paper Management - Part 1: Reduce the Influx

The influx of paper into our homes on a daily basis can be overwhelming. We get more mail in a single day than our grandparents got in an entire year! If you hold on to even half of it, you have the makings of a serious paper crisis on your hands.

And paper comes to us in even more ways than through the mail. There are the papers you bring home from the doctor's office, from your church, from meetings, or school. There are ads you pick up and receipts you bring home. There are magazines and promotion material and business cards. If you live anywhere long enough, these items can really pile up.

How can we control this avalanche of paper?
  1. Mail - reduce your junk mail     
  • http://www.directmail.com/mail_preference/
  • https://thedma.org/resources/consumer-resources/ - started in 1917, the Direct Marketing Association has made it possible to opt-out of mailing lists through its Mail Preference Service
  • www.Catalogchoice.org - a free service that sends merchants your catalog opt-out request on your behalf
  • www.optoutprescreen.com - to keep your name off prescreened lists which will cut down on credit card offers
  • https://www.charitynavigator.org/ - will help you evaluate charities and when combined with Direct Marketing Association can help you opt out of getting some of the donation solicitations 
We enjoy some of the mail that comes in like letters and cards and perhaps some of those catalogs. But enjoy them and then let them move on. Of course, some cards and letters you may wish to keep, so place them in your memorabilia box but don't keep them all. I have seen clients with trunks and dressers filled with old cards, many of them with no special notes but just a signature.

Some bills will come in and those you must deal with but consider paying on line and after paying a bill, decide if you really need to keep the bill.

   2. Items you pick up and bring home - do you really need it and what do you plan to do with it?
  • Recipes - I strongly suggest that if you bring a recipe home, you try it out within a week to see if it is worth filing away
  • Coupons - know yourself - are these coupons you will really use and how do you plan to keep up with them? - each time you look through your coupons, discard any that have expired
  • Special interest material - if you are collecting information on interests like health, home decorating, landscaping, or vacations - plan a special place to store them and at least once a year look through what you have saved and purge the ones you no longer need
  • Receipts - know why you have kept them - if it is something you plan to return, keep it with the item - is it for something you will get reimbursed for? A charge you want to keep until you reconcile your charge statement? A business expense? A large purchase for your home? Have a plan for storing those you feel you need to keep and let the rest go.
  • Business cards - let go immediately the ones you no longer want - pull information from others by scanning or entering the information into your phone
  • Magazines - read them within the month and let them go - if you can't find time to read them, stop getting them
  • Computer print outs - read them and then decide what action needs to happen - then either do the action or let the print out go
Bottom line - a lot of the paper clutter we have lying around is there because we have not taken the time to decide on what to do with it. It is a deferred decision. Don't let any of this junk paper linger. It will make it so much easier to find the papers that are really important if the unimportant is gone.



Jonda S. Beattie
Professional Organizer

Thursday, August 16, 2018

Priorities - Friends and Family

Our lives are busy, and it is so easy to get caught up in the day to day business and forget to carve out time for the things that are important to us.

For me, family and friends rank right up on the top. I schedule times to visit my children and my siblings. I schedule time to visit with friends. Probably not enough but I do make a regular effort.

This past weekend we really got it together and had an 80th birthday party for my husband, Rob. His family pulled out the stops and came from as far away as Texas. Both of his sons and his step-daughter plus many grandchildren attended. A lot of Rob's friends also attended including one couple who came all the way from Ohio for his party! This get-together took a lot of effort for a lot of people but was so worth it. It was a good reminder that taking time to keep strong relationships with our family and friends really pays off.


Jonda S. Beattie
Professional Organizer